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Can you hear the difference? Listen to IK Multimedia’s mind-blowingly accurate AI Machine Modeling software

IK Multmedia AI Machine Modeling
(Image credit: IK Multimedia)

IK Multimedia’s new AI Machine Modeling software has been causing a stir in the guitar world ever since the Italian firm announced the next stage in its digital evolution last month.

Enabling electric guitar and bass players to accurately model the sound of any distortion pedal, amplifier, cabinet or combo, IK Multimedia says its technology has reached a new level of accuracy that is “virtually indistinguishable from the real thing.”

The good news is AI Machine Modeling does not require the user to purchase any bespoke gear; standard home studio equipment is all that’s required for it to work – specifically a microphone and reamplification box hooked up to an audio interface.

Simply put, an algorithm is created by sending a special capture track through your chosen rig and into the AI Machine Modeling software along with a dry DI track.

IK Multimedia calls the result a Tone Model, and we must admit: what we’ve heard so far has indeed sounded “virtually indistinguishable from the real thing.”

Watch this video featuring a 1953 Fender Bassman from IK’s private amp vault and see if you can tell the difference…

With the release of new demo videos, anticipation has been building as IK Multimedia marches forward towards the launch of its new AI Machine Modeling software.

Having kicked off with a demo of a vintage Fender tweed amp, IK’s latest peek at its new software was released last week with a video focusing on another classic amp from its vault – a high gain Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier.

Sitting at the opposite end of the spectrum from an early ‘50s Fender tweed, the guitar amp featured in IK’s latest demo showcases the new AI Machine Modeling’s versatility.

Walking through the steps required to create a “perfect” Tone Model, viewers are again challenged to be able to hear any difference between the algorithm and the real thing.

Visit IK Multimedia (opens in new tab) for more information.

Rod Brakes is a music journalist with an expertise in guitars. Having spent many years at the coalface as a guitar dealer and tech, Rod's more recent work as a writer covering artists, industry pros and gear includes contributions for leading publications and websites such as Guitarist, Total Guitar, Guitar World (opens in new tab)Guitar Player (opens in new tab) and MusicRadar (opens in new tab) in addition to specialist music books, blogs and social media. He is also a lifelong musician.

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