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Fender releases the Mustang Micro, a headphones guitar amplifier that fits inside your pocket

The new Fender Mustang Micro personal guitar amp, announced at the turn of the year and officially launched today, takes 12 of the Mustang GTX's amp models, 13 effects, and puts it all in a device that is smaller than your phone. 

Simply connect it direct to your guitar, plug in your headphones and play. It's really quite simple, offering a super-low latency stereo performance and classic Fender tones at the touch of a button.

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You can pair the Mustang Micro up to any Bluetooth-equipped device to stream music and jam along to the unit, with a helpful auto A/V sync feature to make that play-along experience as painless as possible.

The Mustang Micro has a straightforward setup. There is one oversized low-profile volume control on the front, with up/down buttons for cycling through amp models, effects, global EQ, and a Modify control for adjusting an effect parameter.

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Fender Mustang Micro

(Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Mustang Micro

(Image credit: Fender)

Powered by a lithium-ion battery, Fender says you should get more than four hours of continuous playing time. There's a USB output for charging the unit, or, should you do something worth committing to tape, you can hook it up to your computer and record.

The Mustang Micro's quarter-inch input rotates 270º degrees and should fit pretty much most guitars and basses.

Priced £89 / $99 / €99, it is available to order now. See Fender for more details.

Fender Mustang Micro

(Image credit: Fender)
Jonathan Horsley

Jonathan Horsley has been writing about guitars since 2005, playing them since 1990, and regularly contributes to MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitar World. He uses Jazz III nylon picks, 10s during the week, 9s at the weekend, and shamefully still struggles with rhythm figure one of Van Halen’s Panama.