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A lost Frankie Knuckles house track recorded during his early studio sessions in the ‘80s is set for release

Frankie Knuckles lost track
(Image credit: Neighbourhood PR)

Frankie Knuckles’ death in 2014 sent shockwaves through the dance music community. Frequently referred to as The Godfather House, he began his career as a DJ, then started adding live drum machine parts to the records as he played them. He went on to produce his own music in the studio, creating history in the process.

Now, the Chicago House music institution and seminal house label DJ International have discovered an unknown and unreleased Knuckles track, I Want The Love Of My Own, which is set to be released in celebration of the 35th anniversary of his first record, You Can’t Hide.

The announcement comes on Frankie Knuckles Day - 25 August - which was initiated in 2004 with the support of the then Illinois state senator and now former President of the USA, Barack Obama. 

Created during his early studio sessions in the ‘80s, the track was found on two-inch reel-to-reel tape, and is thought to be one of the few unreleased Knuckles tracks in existence.

It’s been mixed and enhanced by multi-instrumentalist and producer Eric Kupper, who worked extensively with Knuckles during his career. We’re told that I Want The Love Of My Own will be released in October “in a cutting-edge format that reflects his instinct as a pioneer.”

Frankie Knuckles lost track

(Image credit: Neighbourhood PR)

DJ International is also working in collaboration with Last Man Music, Remixology, Oasis Digital Studios and The Frankie Knuckles Foundation to launch a set of digital and physical products and collectables that celebrate his legacy.

Asked by Computer Music magazine in 2012 if he was really responsible for originating the term ‘house music’, Knuckles said: "That's what they tell me. I was driving past a shop in Chicago and I saw a sign that said, ‘We play house music’.

“I said to my friend, ‘What the hell is house music?’ He said, ‘It's the kind of music you play at the Warehouse.’ [nightclub]. I know there are other people who claim they came up with the name, but that's a true story and that's how I see it.

“Obviously, the idea we have of house music today is very different to the idea I had when I was DJing at the Warehouse. Back then, house was the music you heard at a great house party - a party at your friend's house. A bit of soul, funk… a bit of rock and classical. It was about opening your mind to all the music that was out there.” 

To sign up for updates on the new Frankie Knuckles releases, head to the DJ International website.

Ben Rogerson

I’m the Group Content Manager for MusicRadar, specialising in all things tech. I’ve been playing the piano, gigging in bands and failing to finish tracks at home for more than 30 years, 20 of which I’ve also spent writing about music technology. 

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