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UVI’s Super-7 combines Roland Juno-106 synth and X0X drum machine sounds to create an ‘80s analogue groove station

Released in 1986, Roland’s MKS-7 was a multitimbral sound and rhythm module that contained the combined guts of the Juno-106 synth and TR-707 drum machine. Now it’s been revived and refined by UVI, in the form of Super-7. 

Described as a “6-part analogue toolbox and groove designer,” this looks like something of an ‘80s dream machine, giving you everything you need to create your next synthwave opus. 

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Super-7 comes with 260 ensemble presets - these are based on multisamples of an MKS-7 and drum machine sounds from across the Roland X0X range and beyond.

The ensemble presets have discrete rhythm, bass, melody and three multi-purpose synth layers, all of which have their own voice and arpeggiator controls. Patterns, grooves and sequences can be performed in real-time.

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UVI Super-7

(Image credit: UVI)
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UVI Super-7

(Image credit: UVI)
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UVI Super-7

(Image credit: UVI)
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UVI Super-7

(Image credit: UVI)

Super-7’s sounds were sampled through a custom chain of outboard processors and recorded three times: normally, with the hardware chorus engaged, and with the noise switch active. This means that you can turn these features on or off, just as you could on the hardware.

The presets in Super-7 are fully editable using the amp envelopes, multimode filters and filter envelopes and effects (EQ, drive, phaser and effect sends for two reverbs and two delays). The arpeggiators can also be customised and come with their own presets.

Super-7 runs on PC and Mac and can be hosted in either Falcon or the free UVI Workstation. The regular price is $79/€79, but it’s currently available for $49/€49. 

Find out more on the UVI website.

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