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Solar debuts “more metal” humbuckers on flagship Type A six and seven-string electrics

Solar Guitars has unveiled a new electric guitar pickup design that is now available on a pair of of its top-line models. The Duncan Solar Plus offers what Solar boss and owner Ola Englund describes as a hotter pickup, even more suited to metal.

Right now, the Alnico VIII Duncan Solar Plus is available on two of the brand’s Type A models. There’s the Type A1.6D+, which is dressed in a natural matte finish and distressed hardware, belying the fact that this is a state-of-the-art metal guitar, with a set-through neck build and a design that is geared up for speed and, as Englund might say, chug.

The Type A1.6D+ comprises a solid alder body with a maple neck in a whip-thin C profile. It has an ebony fingerboard topped with 24 extra jumbo frets, with Luminlay glow-in-the-dark side markers to aid orientation. 

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Solar Type A + models

(Image credit: Solar Guitars)
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Solar Type A + models

(Image credit: Solar Guitars)

Those new Duncan Solar + pickups are controlled by a five-way blade selector switch and volume and tone controls. The Type A1.6D+ is another Solar model to be equipped with an EverTune bridge, and has locking Solar tuners to help keep the tuning super solid.

As for the Type A1.7ROP+ [pictured below], in some ways, this is a seven-string version of the Type A1.6D+ in Red Open-Pore Matte finish. The shape is the same. The electrics are the same, as is the hardware. But this has a swamp ash body and a longer 26.5” scale to accommodate the extended-range.

Its ebony fingerboard has a slightly flatter 15.74” radius, with its six-string counterpart’s ‘board measuring 13.78”.

Both models are available to order now direct from Solar Guitars, priced $1,199. And if you are wondering how the Duncan Solar + pickups compare to the Duncan Solar models, well, helpfully Ola Englund has shot a video, which you can watch above.

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Solar Type A + models

(Image credit: Solar Guitars)
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Solar Type A + models

(Image credit: Solar Guitars)

Jonathan Horsley has been writing about guitars and guitar culture since 2005, playing them since 1990, and regularly contributes to MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitar World. He uses Jazz III nylon picks, 10s during the week, 9s at the weekend, and shamefully still struggles with rhythm figure one of Van Halen’s Panama.