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Roland goes back to the groovebox with the MC-707 and MC-101

Roland is getting back into the groovebox game with the MC-707 and MC-101, self-contained music production boxes that take their inspiration from the MC products that long-time producers will remember from the ‘90s. You can read our review of the MC-707 right now.

Roland has other new treats, too: new Fantom workstation keyboards, the Juno-inspired JU-06A Boutique synth, and the Jupiter-X synth line.

Of the grooveboxes, the main draw is undoubtedly the MC-707. This offers eight-track recording, sequencing, sampling, synths and effects. As well as sounds from classic Roland rhythm machines and synths, you’ll also find more contemporary tones.

Roland MC-707

(Image credit: Roland)

We’re promised a fluid workflow, with the 16 pads being used for playing/sequencing drums, basslines, chord progressions and more. The step sequencer, meanwhile, is inspired by the one used on Roland’s classic TR drum machines.

Although the MC-707 is designed to work standalone, you can also hook it up to your computer via USB. Doing this enables you to send all eight parts to individual tracks in your DAW, and also to capture audio loops in the MC-707.

The MC-101 is a more portable groovebox with many of the same features, but cuts the track count down to four and offers a battery power option.

Shipping this month, the MC-707 and MC-101 cost $999.99 and $499.99 respectively. Find out more on the Roland website.

Roland MC-101

(Image credit: Roland)
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