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Kia jumps from SUVs to VSTs as it releases move.ment, a free plugin instrument

Car manufacturer Kia is switching gears and releasing a free virtual instrument that goes by the name of move.ment.

Launched as part of a new marketing campaign of the same name - “all creative activities begin with a movement,” apparently, though presumably not a bowel-related one - this runs on PC and Mac both standalone and as a plugin.

Created in collaboration with DaHouse Audio, move.ment is based on the sounds of nature, which Kia captured all over the world. Its development was driven by science, we’re assured: “The sounds of movement in nature produce what’s known as pink noise,” says Kia. “This increases the alpha waves in the brain, inducing the flow state of consciousness, the state in which the brain is at its most creative.”

There’s more where that came from, too, as Kia says that every composition should be arranged by following four neuroscientific parameters. These are listed as BPM, Harmonic Progressions, Melodic Intervals and Texture.

Beyond the marketing flim flam, move.ment actually looks quite interesting. After selecting your nature sound source, you can shape it in the Mixer section, which comes with individual controls for the Sampler, VCO, Noise and Reverb effect. There’s also a filter, an ADSR envelope and an Output section.

Kia has already been putting move.ment to use to create its new sound logo and the sounds for its new EV6 electric SUV. The instrument has also inspired a four-track album that features compositions from up-and-coming artists.

You can download move.ment now from the Kia (opens in new tab) website. 

Ben Rogerson
Ben Rogerson

I’m the Group Content Manager for MusicRadar, specialising in all things tech. I previously spent eight years working on our sister magazine, Computer Music. I’ve been playing the piano, gigging in bands and failing to finish tracks at home for more than 30 years, 20 of which I’ve also spent writing about music technology. 

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