Best cheap guitar pedals 2024: Budget-friendly stompboxes that prove cheap doesn't mean compromising on tone

Boss DS-1 distortion pedal on a wooden floor
(Image credit: Future)

Guitar pedal addiction is part blessing and part blight, a rewarding hobby and unfortunately, a great way to spend money quickly. Guitarists are quick to give up the cash when it comes to limited-run custom artwork and period-correct components but do we really need to spend loads of money to sound great? As the cost of living crisis continues to affect guitarists around the world, the best cheap guitar pedals can fill that gap in your pedalboard without you having to cut back on necessities or save up for months on end.

It’s always good to be mindful that cheap doesn’t necessarily equate to good. There are many shoddy pedals out there that are mass-manufactured for profit rather than great tone but fear not, many of the biggest guitar brands have lines of pedals for the budget conscious. From big names like Electro-Harmonix and Fender right through to pedalboard staples like the ProCo Rat and Ibanez Tubescreamer, you really don’t have to spend big to sound huge.

We’ve put together a great selection of bargain guitar pedals for you covering all sonic territories from overdrive and distortion through to delay and reverb. If you’re new to the wide world of guitar pedals, make sure to check out our buying advice section. If you just want to see the best cheap pedals available today, keep scrolling…

Best cheap guitar pedals: MusicRadar's choice

With phenomenal sound and affordability, the MXR Distortion + takes the top spot for us here. Used by everyone from Randy Rhoads to PJ Harvey, this canary-yellow stompbox can give you a light touch of smooth color right through to full-on, chaotic distortion. It’s deceptively cheap and easy to use, but don’t let that fool you into thinking it doesn’t have depth.

At the other end of the guitar pedal spectrum, we’ve got the TC Electronic Skysurfer Mini Reverb, which gives you three types of reverb in a classic stompbox format. Reverb pedals can get pretty pricey but this one comes in below £/$50, making it outstanding value for your money.

Finally, we have to highlight the Vox V845 Wah, the perfect option for players who need great sounds on a budget. Smoother and less treble-heavy than the famous Cry Baby, this Vox wah is based on the first ever commercially available wah pedal, giving you a boutique tone for less.

Best cheap guitar pedals: Product guide

Best cheap guitar pedals: MXR Distortion Plus

(Image credit: MXR)

1. MXR Distortion Plus

An icon of the pedal world is more affordable than you might think

Specifications

Type: Overdrive/ Distortion
Power: 9V
Controls: Output, Distortion

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to use 
+
Great sound 
+
Rugged enclosure

Reasons to avoid

-
Too simple for some 

This little yellow box had a massive impact on the world of guitar when it was released way back in 1979 and continues to be a staple on pedalboards around the globe. Okay, the modern version may not be made in Rochester, New York, like the original, but still, it has the same tone that many iconic guitarists fell in love with. 

Famous for its simplistic controls - output and distortion - this pedal is entirely idiot-proof. That said, the dual controls are very sensitive and work in tandem with one another to create a wide array of tones. For a bluesy breakup, keep the gain low while cranking the output to drive your amp harder. For full-on face-melting hard rock tones, gun the distortion knob and let rip!

We have to mention that this pedal can get a little bright for some players, so it's worth bearing that in mind when you are setting up your amplifier

Best cheap guitar pedal: Boss DS-1

(Image credit: Boss)

2. Boss DS-1

The most famous distortion pedal in the world?

Specifications

Type: Distortion
Power: 9V
Controls: Volume, Distortion, Tone

Reasons to buy

+
Classic distortion tone
+
Built like a tank 
+
Easy to dial in

Reasons to avoid

-
Sound not for everyone 

The Boss DS-1 doesn't really need an introduction, it's arguably the most popular distortion pedal in the world. That said, we don't think we've ever seen anyone actually buy one, they just seem to materialise in the gig bags, cases and studios of unsuspecting guitar players. 

For as basic as the humble DS-1 is, with its iconic three-knob layout, it's been used by some of the most famous players around. It helped Kurt Cobain speak to the disenfranchised youth of the 90s, it was there when Joe Satriani redefined instrumental guitar music and was even around when The Cure took goth to the masses - not too bad for a pedal that costs under $/£100. 

The modern version of the classic circuit remains unchanged, meaning you are getting the exact same tone your heroes did back in the day. Like the MXR pedal above, the DS-1 has a wide range of tones locked away inside. This pedal can do everything from smooth crunch to searing lead lines and everything in between.  

Best cheap guitar pedals: NUX Tape Core Deluxe Echo

(Image credit: NUX)

3. NUX Tape Core Deluxe Echo

Realistic tape echo on a budget

Specifications

Type: Delay
Power: 9V
Controls: Time, Mix, Repeat, Selector, Mode

Reasons to buy

+
Realistic tape echo sounds 
+
3 reproduction heads 
+
Bags of character

Reasons to avoid

-
Too dark for some

NUX are a relative newcomer to the pedal game, having made their debut in 2006, but since then, they have established themselves as a leading force in the budget pedal space. Now, NUX has a number of effects in their ever-growing lineup, but we've chosen to focus on the newly released Tape Core Deluxe Echo, as frankly, we can't believe you can get a realistic-sounding tape delay at this price! 

In an attempt to reproduce the sonic signature of a real tape machine, this NUX delay features three reproduction heads, which gives you up to seven different combinations of delay - and better yet, the repeat dial can also be used to create the infinite feedback oscillation effect achievable on physical tape units. 

So if you need a delay pedal with a little character, then the NUX Tape Core Deluxe Echo could be precisely what you are looking for.  

Best cheap guitar pedals: TC Electronic Skysurfer Mini Reverb

(Image credit: TC Electronic )

4. TC Electronic Skysurfer Mini Reverb

Add some much need ambience without spending a fortune

Specifications

Type: Reverb
Power: 9V
Controls: Reverb, Mix, Tone, Mode

Reasons to buy

+
Versatile sounds
+
Simple to use
+
Compact form factor

Reasons to avoid

-
Doesn't do shimmer 

Reverb has to be the most used effect of all time - most of us can't even play the guitar without at least a touch of this spacious effect on our tone. There is one problem with this lush effect, though, it's typically very expensive - or at least it used to be. 

TC Electronic has made a name for themselves in the budget pedal space, offering guitar players high-quality and innovative pedals at seriously low prices, and the Skysurfer is their take on not one reverb sound but three. Delivering Spring, Plate and Hall modes, this natural-sounding 'verb pedal covers a lot of sonic ground, and for us, it's the perfect always-on pedal.

This rugged little stomp even comes in a robust metal enclosure, meaning you don't have to worry about stepping on this unit in anger at your next show - it will definitely be able to take it. 

Best cheap guitar pedals: ProCo Rat 2

(Image credit: Pro Co)

5. Pro Co Rat 2

This underground hero is affordable, reliable and ready to melt faces

Specifications

Type: Distortion
Power: 9V
Controls: Distortion, Filter, Volume

Reasons to buy

+
Super versatile
+
Simple layout
+
Legendary distortion tones

Reasons to avoid

-
Too harsh for some players 

The Rat is a filthy, nasty, sludgy-sounding pedal that we believe should be on every pedalboard - yes, even jazz 'boards, come on, live a little. Okay, we are clearly joking, but we do strongly believe every player should experience the thrill of plugging into an obnoxiously loud amp that's being driven by a Pro Co Rat. 

This pedal may come in at under $/£100, but it is beloved by some pretty notable players. The "nicest man in rock", Dave Grohl, famously used the Rat to dirty up the sound of the debut Foo's album, Cobain used one directly into a Neve console to achieve the visceral tone of Territorial Pissings and metal's greatest down-picker, James Hetfield used one in combination with a cranked Marshall to define the sound of early thrash.  

That said, it's not just players who love this pedal. Stompbox manufacturers such as JHS, Earthquaker Devices, Big Ear and Jam all make loving recreations - albeit with a few modifications. Unfortunately, these pedals can sometimes run into the hundreds, making it even more of a no-brainer to just pick up an official Rat. So if you are looking for a gnarly distortion, then you need to check out this absolutely brilliant pedal.

It's worth noting that there is a Pro Co Lil Rat available for a little extra cash if you need a space-saving option. 

Best cheap guitar pedals: Electro Harmonix Nano Clone Chorus

(Image credit: Electro Harmonix )

6. Electro-Harmonix Nano Clone Chorus

A heritage chorus pedal for the same price as some clones

Specifications

Type: Chorus
Power: 9V
Controls: Rate

Reasons to buy

+
Simple to use
+
Rugged enclosure
+
Iconic tones 

Reasons to avoid

-
Limited control set

Sometimes you just want a simple pedal that has very little in the way of controls, and you can't get more simple than the Electro-Harmonix Nano Clone Chorus. With a solitary Rate control, this pedal may not have a ton of tone-shaping abilities, but with a chorus sound this iconic, that really isn't necessary.

This true bypass stomp comes in the classic destressed die-cast chassis you've come to expect from EHX and produces a rich and lush chorus sound that's super easy to dial in. 

If the limited layout is an issue for you, it's worth mentioning that for an extra $30/£20, you can grab the

, which offers you an additional depth toggle switch. 

Best cheap guitar pedals: Vox V845 Classic Wah

(Image credit: Vox)

7. Vox V845 Classic Wah

Classic '60s wah for less

Specifications

Type: Wah
Power: 9V
Controls: N/A

Reasons to buy

+
Sounds just like the original 
+
Easy to use 
+
Smooth tone

Reasons to avoid

-
Smaller than a regular wah pedal

Vox would introduce the world to the first-ever commercially available wah pedal in 1967, and it's fair to say it turned the guitar world on its head. Marketed initially to woodwind players, through the use of famous jazz trumpeter Clyde McCoy's image, this pedal would go on to capture the hearts and imagination of the Voodoo Child himself, Jimi Hendrix, as well as other legendary players such as Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton and Tony Iommi. 

Today the cheapest way to get your hands on this retro wah tone is to opt for the Vox V845. This sleek blacked-out wah does an amazing job at recreating the smooth, mid-focused sweep of the original wah and is perfect for anyone looking to add extra expression to their lead work. 

The Vox wah-wah typically has a smoother, richer tone when compared to the

Dunlop Crybaby
and is far less harsh at the top end. So, if you've never gotten on with the fierce treble of the Crybaby style wah, then you may want to give the Vox a go. 

Best cheap guitar pedals: Ibanez Tube Screamer TS Mini

(Image credit: Ibanez)
The mean, green, tone machine in a 'board friendly format

Specifications

Type: Overdrive
Power : 9V
Controls: Overdrive, Tone, Level

Reasons to buy

+
Great solo boost
+
Adds mids to Fender amps
+
Fits on any 'board 

Reasons to avoid

-
Small knobs are awkward 

Continuing our theme of mythical pedals, here's the tiny green box that's responsible for some of the most influential guitar tones ever recorded. The original

is a behemoth of the stompbox world, and its emblematic circuit is often mimicked, modified and expanded on - with boutique variations not giving you much change from $/£200. Luckily then, you can pick up the official Ibanez offering for around $/£100. 

Better yet, the mini version is not only perfect for those who want to save precious pedalboard real estate, but it's even cheaper, at around $79/£55! Don't worry, you don't lose any functionality by going to the smaller format, and you keep the classic three-knob control layout. 

This tiny emerald stomp is perfect for those looking for an aggressive mid-range bark and is our go-to for a solo boost that's sure to get you heard.

Read the full Ibanez Tube Screamer Mini review

Best cheap guitar pedals: Electro-Harmonix Nano Big Muff

(Image credit: Electro-Harmonix)
Sometimes only a fuzz pedal will cut it

Specifications

Type: Fuzz
Power: 9V
Controls: Volume, Tone, Sustain

Reasons to buy

+
Built to last
+
Easy to use 
+
Iconic sound

Reasons to avoid

-
Not as fuzzy as a fuzz face or fuzz factory 

The Electro Harmonix Nano Big Muff is the same creamy fuzz pedal you know and love, just in a smaller format. Gone is the large - albeit rather cool looking - cumbersome enclosure, in favour of a modern mini pedal case, which will play nicer with the other pedals on your 'board. 

The Nano keeps the famous controls of Volume, Tone and Sustain and is more than capable of delivering those Dinosaur Jnr tones you and your Jazzmaster have been searching for. As you'd expect, this pedal can run on a 9V battery - which is included - or with a standard pedalboard power supply.

If you'd rather have the original look - as well as the sound - then you can get the

, which costs a little extra. To be honest, for us, the smaller format of the Nano coupled with the more attractive price tag outweighs the look of the retro enclosure. 

Read the full Electro-Harmonix Nano Big Muff review

Best cheap guitar pedals: Fender Hammertone Space Delay

(Image credit: Fender)

10. Fender Hammertone Space Delay

A brilliant budget digital delay pedal from the big ‘F’

Specifications

Type: Digital delay
Power: 9V
Controls: Time, Feedback, Level, Pattern, Mod

Reasons to buy

+
Lovely modulated sound
+
Simple to setup
+
Usable tones

Reasons to avoid

-
Might not be 'out there' enough for some 

The Fender Hammertone Space Delay is part of the latest line of budget-busting pedals from the big ‘F’. Housed in smart-looking grey enclosures these pedals aim to offer top-notch sound at a price that won’t break the bank, and boy do they deliver.

The Space Delay can to that classic tape warble sound, as well as oscillating atmospheric delays and even just a simple slapback if that’s what you need. It’s super versatile and while it doesn’t do some of the crazier things more expensive pedals can offer, you’ll find this can cover the bases for the majority of delay sounds.

One of the best things about this pedal is the simple-to-use control set. No menu-diving here just a few knobs and switches that make it a breeze to set up your desired sound or adjust things on the fly. The handy top-mount jacks mean it’ll fit on a busy ‘board, and the rugged enclosure ensures it will put up with all the rigors of regular gigging.

Best cheap guitar pedals: Buying advice

MXR Distortion Plus on a pedalboard

(Image credit: Future)

Are cheap guitar pedals worth it?

It wasn’t all that long ago that cheap guitar pedals were looked down on, dismissed and even ridiculed, but today, it’s a very different story. With advancements in technology, pedals have become easier - and cheaper - to produce, meaning you no longer need to spend a small fortune to get a great-sounding stompbox. 

Cheap pedals are not only great if you are looking to assemble an affordable yet functioning ‘board for playing live but also for those looking to experiment with lots of different effects and sounds. With many pedals coming in at sub $/£50, you can afford to buy a few and see what works for you.

They also make an excellent platform for those into DIY pedal kits as a place to start when learning how to mod pedals. 

What makes a great cheap guitar pedal?

For us, if a big name brand releases a cheap pedal variation, it must embody what that company is known for in terms of tone, built quality and reliability. Just because a pedal costs less doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be great! 

We like to see pedals that are designed to withstand the harsh conditions of the rehearsal room or stage, with quality components and, most importantly, a footswitch that will take a beating! Of course, we know these pedals won’t last as long as more premium options, but still, they need to be as reliable as possible. Luckily, every pedal on this list fits this bill.

What brands make the best cheap guitar pedals?

Right now, we live in the golden age of cheap guitar pedals. Not only are there affordable options from new and up-and-coming brands, but legacy manufacturers are also offering a slew of legendary effects for next to no money! 

We prefer to stick to well-known brands when it comes to cheap effects, as you know precisely what you are getting for your cash. Brands such as Boss, Electro-Harmonix, TC Electronics, Ibanez, Pro Co, and JHS all offer superb pedals at stellar prices. 

Yes, there are cheaper options out there, but with these brands, you’re guaranteed to not have to buy twice, as they won’t immediately break down on you after a couple of songs - saving you money in the long run.

How we choose the best cheap guitar pedals

MusicRadar's got your back Our team of expert musicians and producers spends hours testing products to help you choose the best music-making gear for you. Find out more about how we test.

At MusicRadar, we understand the importance of finding high-quality guitar pedals at an affordable price. With our commitment to helping musicians on a budget, we have extensively researched and tested numerous pedals to identify the best options available in the realm of affordable guitar effects.

To compile our list of top cheap guitar pedals, we combine our expertise, meticulous research, and insightful discussions with our editorial team. We consider factors such as sound quality, build quality, versatility, user-friendliness, and value for money, ensuring that we showcase the finest affordable guitar pedals on the market.

As guitar players ourselves, we recognize the need for access to quality gear that doesn't break the bank. Whether you're a beginner looking to experiment with different sounds or a seasoned player seeking budget-friendly options without compromising on tone, our goal is to provide reliable and informed recommendations that help you discover the perfect cheap guitar pedals to fuel your creativity.

Read more about how we test music-making gear and services at MusicRadar.

Daryl Robertson

I'm a Senior Deals Writer at MusicRadar, and I'm responsible for writing and maintaining buyer's guides on the site - but that's not all I do. As part of my role, I also scour the internet for the best deals I can find on gear and get hands-on with the products for reviews. I have a massive passion for anything that makes a sound, in particular guitars, pianos and recording equipment. In a previous life, I worked in music retail, giving advice on all aspects of music creation, selling everything from digital pianos to electric guitars, entire PA systems to ukuleles. I'm also a fully qualified sound engineer with experience working in various venues in Scotland.

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