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Generate endless drum samples using AI with the new Synapse Drums service

AI is likely to change the process of music production in ways that we haven’t even thought about yet - or, perhaps, ways that we don’t want to think about - a fact proven by AudiaLab’s new Synapse Drums service.

This is unlike anything we’ve seen before in that it promises to create an endless number of drum samples from scratch. It was ‘trained’ with machine learning using 1000s of drum samples from all genres of music, plus a few weirder sounds to keep things interesting.

As things stand, the interface is extremely simple, comprising just a grid of four squares. In the top left, you have the current drum sample, while in the square below you’ll find options to create another one that sounds similar, generate something completely new and download your current creation.

Over to the right, meanwhile, are volume and reverb controls, which you can set prior to downloading.

It’d be nice to have a bit more editing flexibility, and to be able to specify what kind of drum sample you want to be generated (kick, snare, hi-hat, etc) but Synapse Drums certainly seems like a promising piece of work. 

The current roadmap includes plans to create a VST/AU plugin version and form artist/label partnerships, and you can expect community tools and a marketplace, too.

The service is currently at the early alpha stage, and is set to operate on a subscription basis with Basic, Premium and Elite tiers. These are priced at $10, $20 and $30 respectively.

Find out more on the AudiaLab (opens in new tab) website.

AudiaLab Synapse Drums

(Image credit: AudiaLab)
Ben Rogerson
Ben Rogerson

I’m the Group Content Manager for MusicRadar, specialising in all things tech. I previously spent eight years working on our sister magazine, Computer Music. I’ve been playing the piano, gigging in bands and failing to finish tracks at home for more than 30 years, 20 of which I’ve also spent writing about music technology. 

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