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Line 6 unveils Helix multi-effects pedal

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Line 6 Helix

Line 6 Helix

Line 6 Helix

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Line 6 Helix - back

Line 6 Helix - back

Line 6 Helix - back

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Line 6 Helix Rack

Line 6 Helix Rack

Line 6 Helix Rack

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Line 6 Helix Control

Line 6 Helix Control

Line 6 Helix Control

Although the Firehawk has barely landed in stores, Line 6 has announced its new flagship multi-effects pedal and processor: the Helix.

Based on the all-new HX modelling engine, the Helix builds on Line 6's previous HD modelling to offer more nuanced sounds, with model-specific bloom and compression characteristics.

Line 6 has revamped the user interface, too, awarding the Helix with a 6.2" colour LCD display, customisable footswitch labels and - brilliantly - a joystick, while its construction is dubbed "tour-grade".

The footswitches themselves are also touch sensitive, allowing you to touch to select, hold to assign and press to engage - and by holding the mode switch and utilising the expression pedal, the Helix also offers hands-free adjustment of parameters.

Around the back, there are the usual ins and outs, plus expression outputs for amp and stompbox expression control, a mic input with phantom power, four (count 'em!) sends and returns, SPDIF in/out, XLR out, MIDI in/out, USB and a Variax connection.

Line 6 has been oddly quiet on the actual list of effects, but we do know that the Helix will include impulse responses, while we'd expect a host of new tones on top of updated POD HD sounds.

The Helix will be available at the end of summer 2015 for $1,499. Helix Rack (also $1,499) and Helix Control ($499) units are also on their way (see gallery images above). Stay tuned for more, and in the meantime, head over to Line 6 for a rather snazzy tour of the Helix floor unit's functionality.

Michael Brown

Mike is editor-in-chief of GuitarWorld.com, in addition to being an offset fiend and recovering pedal addict. He's spent the past decade writing and editing for guitar publications including MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitarist, and a decade-and-a-half performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). In his free time, you'll find him making progressive instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe.