Skip to main content

Will the new Fender Tone Master Princeton Reverb hit the sweet spot for modelling amps?

Fender
(Image credit: Fender)

Fender has revealed the latest addition to its Tone Master range of guitar amps; the Princeton Reverb 1x10. The £799 combo will be available from November and sees Fender continuing its commitment to recreating its iconic tube amp models as lighter weight, digital combos without compromising on tone.

It says a lot that the reliability of Tone Masters due to their components (no valve replacements needed urgently on a show day) has seen Lenny Kravitz and Mike McCready using them on the road recently. And the slightly lower price of this 1x10" model compared to the other Tone Master models. 

Fender

(Image credit: Fender)

The lighter weight pine cabinets used for Tone Masters also make a massive difference to lug around, and with built-in IR cab simulations, you also have flexibility. 

We've also been very impressed at the results of DI recording with Tone Masters in the past. With the onboard reverb and tremolo effects further sweetening the deal with the Princeton. 

And while the term 'pedal platform' gets thrown around a bit too frequently these days for our liking, it really does apply to a lot of Fender's combos for their high headroom with sparkling cleans. A lovely canvas for you to get gain stacking over with overdrive pedals

Fender

(Image credit: Fender)

The speaker here is a 10" Jensen C10R and for using on stage and in your home there's an output power selector for full power and five attenuated settings, alongside the balanced XLR line output with the onboard impulse response (IR) cabinet sims. There's also a hand-mute switch for silent stage or recording use.

A cover and two-button footswitch is also included.

Find out more at Andertons (opens in new tab)

Rob Laing
Guitars Editor, MusicRadar

I'm the Guitars Editor for MusicRadar, handling news, reviews, features, tuition, advice for the strings side of the site and everything in between. Before MusicRadar I worked on guitar magazines for 15 years, including Editor of Total Guitar. I've currently set aside any pipe dreams of getting anywhere with my own songs and I am enjoying playing covers in function bands.