Skip to main content

Earthquaker explores a galaxy of reverb tones with its new Astral Destiny pedal

Earthquaker Devices
(Image credit: Earthquaker Devices )

GEAR 2021: You can count of Akron, Ohio's Earthquaker Devices to deliver inspirational effects pedals, and its new Astral Destiny modulated octave reverb looks like another beaut. That name alone hints at huge possibilities and the features do too… oh, and just listen to those ethereal sounds in the extended demo video above!

(Image credit: Earthquaker Devices )

The Astral Destiny modulated octave reverb pedal offers eight reverb modes, eight editable presets and assignable expression control.

You can add tails to the reverb sounds for natural reverb decay to linger even when the effect is bypassed, and there's an intriguing 'stretch' feature that doubles the length of the reverb while adding an adjustable pitch bending effect. That sounds like a lot of fun. 

  • NAMM 2021 is cancelled, but we'll be covering all the big January gear announcements right here on MusicRadar.

And the Astral Destiny will look great on your pedalboard thanks to its case artwork by Marvel comic book artist, Matt Horak.

Earthquaker Devices

(Image credit: Earthquaker Devices )

The modes in this USA-made pedal are as follows:

Abyss: Huge reverb with no octave effect

Shimmer: Adds an upper octave to the reverb tail

Sub: Adds a lower octave to the reverb tail

Sub Shimmer: Adds an upper and lower octave to the reverb tail

Astral: Adds an upper and lower octave combined with a regenerating tail

Ascend: Upward pitch bending; best used on sustained notes and chords

Descend: Downward pitch bending; best used on sustained notes and chords

Cosmos: Adds a regenerating fifth to the reverb tail; best used on sustained notes and chords

The US price for the Astral Destiny is $199. More info at Earthquaker Devices

Rob Laing

I'm the Guitars Editor for MusicRadar, handling news, reviews, features, tuition, advice for the strings side of the site and everything in between. Before that I worked on guitar magazines for 15 years, including Editor of Total Guitar.