Skip to main content

Farida CT-36 review

Classic rocking electric with 'tapped tones

  • £469
The body looks a little Fender-y but is actually formed from a solid slab of mahogany

Our Verdict

Speed freaks will enjoy the neck's slim-profile come-hithers, and everyone, its tone.

Pros

  • Thick, luxurious humbucker tones. Neck will suit speedy players. Coil-tapped tonal options. Lots of fun.

Cons

  • We'd prefer a thicker neck.

As the big daddy of Farida's CT series, the CT-36 is priced accordingly. But it's the sort of imaginatively spec'd instrument that presently makes Farida such an attractive option for those on a budget who are looking for a something a little bit special.

"The CT-36 has a couple of surprises in two coil-taps on its treble pots - which make the guitar a little more than just a classic rocker"

With two vintage-voiced Alnico humbuckers seated in a solid slab of contoured mahogany, at first blush the CT-36 specialises in a tone that'd harden the arteries: cream and beef; warm, rounded and hearty. There's a thick, luxurious quality to the CT-36 when operating out of either the bridge or neck humbucker.

It has a slim, satin-finished maple neck that's bolted onto the body. It's good fun to play, and has a tone that's incredible at this price. But the CT-36 has a couple of surprises in two coil-taps on its treble pots - which make the guitar a little more than just a classic rocker.

When activated, they open up a whole new world of tone, from glassy, authoritative cleans, to elastic single-coil tones that are just the bee's knees for chicken pickin' and rockabilly.

Again, this option speaks to the attraction of Farida as a brand; offering this up at this price is a compelling reason to decommission brand and national snobbery.

Of course, it's not perfect. It might play a bit more comfortably with a thicker neck, but speed freaks will enjoy the neck's slim-profile come-hithers, and everyone, its tone.

Jonathan Horsley

Jonathan Horsley has been writing about guitars since 2005, playing them since 1990, and regularly contributes to MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitar World. He uses Jazz III nylon picks, 10s during the week, 9s at the weekend, and shamefully still struggles with rhythm figure one of Van Halen’s Panama.