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Legowelt shows off his cheap 'thrift store' vintage synth collection

Dutch producer Legowelt is well-known for being a gear obsessive and synth nerd of the highest order. Our very own Future Music Magazine took a memorable tour of his studio back in 2014, but it seems that his collection has expanded by quite some degree since then.

In a new video from Thomann (opens in new tab), Legowelt takes us on a guided tour of his considerable synth collection, highlighting some lesser-known and inexpensive instruments that have a delightfully nostalgic sound. The producer talks about the instruments that shaped the soundtrack for his upcoming feature animation film, Ambient Trip Commander.

"I'm using a lot of '80s home keyboards," he says, showing us the JVC KB-700, a vintage keyboard with a rudimentary mono synth built in. Next up, he shows off the Yamaha PSS-480, a 2-operator FM synth that shares a chip with '90s PC soundcards, lending it a curious sound that's reminiscent of retro RPG games. 

Elsewhere in the studio tour, Legowelt singles out his Microstation, a petite early '00s instrument from Korg that he describes as one of his favourite synthesizers. "It's basically a micro version of the Korg Triton," he tells us. "It can do these amazingly cool, Rhodes-style pianos that you can program really crazily, with amp simulations and filters."  

Later in the video, Legowelt runs us through more contemporary synths - including a Sequential Oberheim OB-6 and the modern-day Prophet-5 - and a ton of vintage rackmount gear. We needn't say more - dive in. 

Legowelt's Ambient Trip Commander is out now.  (opens in new tab)

Matt Mullen
Matt Mullen

I'm the Tech Features Editor for MusicRadar, working on everything from artist interviews to tech tutorials. I've been writing about (and making) electronic music for over a decade, and when I'm not behind my laptop keyboard, you'll find me behind a MIDI keyboard or a synthesizer. 

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