Skip to main content

Cort's got a new flagship guitar – is the G300 Pro more affordable competition for the Ibanez AZ?

Cort's electric guitars consistently impress on the spec / price ratio and the new flagship G Series G300 Pro model sets out its stall with a comprehensive feature range that tick a lot of boxes. 

Cort

(Image credit: Cort)

It's the first 24-fret G series model and offers a combination of Amercian basswood body with 6mm maple top to offer "bright sparkle" to your tone and a compound radius fingerboard, ranging from 12 inches to 16 inches, for enhanced comfort between chord and solo playing. This model also features Cort's newly designed Ergo-V neck profile to enhance that playability. There's a contoured neck heel too for reaching the dustiest reaches of the dusty end. 

Cort

(Image credit: Cort)

Jumbo stainless steel frets are another premium feature here on roasted maple neck (darker than any others we've seen actually), with Luminlay side dot position markers helping fretboard navigation on dark stages. 

Pickups are a Seymour Duncan TB4 bridge humbucker and SH2N neck humbucker with a 5-way switching system to offer single-coil sounds in the second and fourth positions. 

Cort's CFA-III Tremolo features stainless steel saddles, a solid machined steel block, and a steel baseplate for "improved sustain, faster and punchier pick attack" with a  recessed tremolo bridge. 

Cort

(Image credit: Cort)

A spoke nut Hotrod truss rod enables easier adjustment for players and the G300 Pro also features Cort's  locking tuners provide excellent tuning stability as well as ease of tuning and string changes.

It's available in Vivid Burgundy and Black – MRSP is $1,199.99 and we're seeing street prices around £749 in the UK. 

Learn more at Cort and check out Phillip McKnight's analysis of the new G300 Pro in Black below – it's looking good! 

Rob Laing

I'm the Guitars Editor for MusicRadar, handling news, reviews, features, tuition, advice for the strings side of the site and everything in between. Before that I worked on guitar magazines for 15 years, including Editor of Total Guitar.