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T-Rex Alberta II review

A double dose of dirt

  • £199
  • €309
  • $369
The 'fat' switches are great for beefing up solos

Our Verdict

T-Rex has managed to satisfy fans of the original, while adding enough new features and versatility to entice players who have yet to pay a visit to Alberta.

Pros

  • Meaty medium gain tones. Flexible. Excellent build quality.

Cons

  • Can't run both channels together.

There's a legend behind T-Rex's latest overdrive. Players of the original single-channel Alberta loved it so much, they would use two of 'em: one for rhythm; one for higher-gain lead. And thus, the Alberta II is born, with two channels of classic American dirt, plus a pair of fat switches for extra low-end punch.

"Kick in channel 1 and you're greeted with a Tube Screamer-ish drive that's smooth and creamy"

Kick in channel 1 and you're greeted with a Tube Screamer-ish drive that's smooth and creamy, and retains plenty of your guitar's character. Channel 2, however, is voiced to provide a more open sound that's not as thick and compressed as 1. So, 2 is your trip for break-up rhythm sounds, leaving 1 for searing hot solos.

The Alberta II's strengths lie in meaty medium-gain tones, providing plenty of grunt for raunchy Texan blues or ballsy drop D riffing. Unfortunately, you can't run both channels together, so this isn't the pedal for overdrive-cascading gain freaks.

Guitarists far and wide will love those two new fat switches, though: flick them on for solo playing, then back to normal to let the bass handle the low-end for gigs and recording.

With the Alberta II, T-Rex has managed to satisfy fans of the original, while adding enough new features and versatility to entice players who have yet to pay a visit to Alberta, too. Not bad for a sequel.

Michael Brown

Mike is editor-in-chief of GuitarWorld.com, in addition to being an offset fiend and recovering pedal addict. He's spent the past decade writing and editing for guitar publications including MusicRadar, Total Guitar and Guitarist, and a decade-and-a-half performing in bands of variable genre (and quality). In his free time, you'll find him making progressive instrumental rock under the nom de plume Maebe.