Alhambra 2F review

Alhambra enters the flamenco game

  • £325
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Our Verdict

Good guitar for the money you pay and the quality of sound it has.

Pros

  • Good price for the beginner.
  • Bright sound with volume.

Cons

  • Overall finish is a little untidy.

Though it is known predominantly for its classical guitars, Alhambra has upped its game with its flamenco models, which have become increasingly popular over the last couple of years. 

Build

This entry-level flamenco guitar is a well-crafted model with good balance when used in the traditional seated flamenco posture. 

While most flamenco guitars have spruce tops, popular for their lighter tones and percussive quality, this model has a solid red cedar top (of the Canadian variety), making this guitar a much more interesting specimen. The tones of cedar wood more commonly produce warmer, mellifluous tones but that’s not the case with this Alhambra 2F. 

Sounds

It has a springy tone with plenty of attack aided by a very thin top making it highly responsive. There’s less tonal range here (with a bias towards the brighter, lucent sound) compared to the other two instruments on review. A lower neck action gives you the chance to make the flamenco ‘buzz’ with relative ease. These two qualities make it perfect for those starting out - you can get that flamenco groove going almost instantaneously. 

This Alhambra 2F is an extremely light model. The back and sides, made from sycamore, have an extremely even grain with an open pore satin finish so it doesn’t have the glossiest of finishes - you certainly won’t get glare under spotlight, if that’s what you’re striving for. 

Instead it has a more sedate, grounded charm. The headstock and neck are one step away from having a clean finish, with the smallest amount of untidy glue showing. This won’t affect the sound though. 

The left hand has easy work up and down the Indian rosewood fingerboard, while our right hand feels like it could do with a bit more space. 

Alhambra also gives you options to add onboard electrics and more advanced ‘golpeadores’ (otherwise known as tap plates). These will be things you’ll want to add once you’ve found the flamenco rhythm. At £325, for a guitar constructed in Spain using older seasoned grain, you won’t find another at this price. 

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Tech Specs

OriginSpain
TopSolid cedar
NeckMahogany