Seymour Duncan Vapor Trail review

  • £149
  • €188
  • $214

Modulated delay reaches for the sky

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Our Verdict

An analogue delay pedal that extends the sonic palette beyond the standard.

For

  • Practical features. Warm delays, but doesn't obscure existing tone.

Against

  • Not much.
Buying options

A true analogue delay, built around Bucket Brigade chips (BBDs), Seymour Duncan's Vapor Trail offers repeats of up to 600ms, with or without modulation.

"The repeats have warmth, but remain close in tone to the dry sound"

The latter can be added by two miniature knobs dialling in the rate and depth for a more ethereal and floaty flavour to the repeats.

An extra socket lets you send the wet signal separately from the dry, plug in an expression pedal to control the delay mix, or (with a Y lead) add another effect to the repeats.

The repeats have warmth, but remain close in tone to the dry sound - Seymour Duncan has resisted the temptation to make them darker and more degraded than they need to be, but they still have that analogue quality of trailing away into silence.

The 600ms range covers plenty of practical territory, from slapback through to single-head tape delay emulation, helped along by the modulation adding a touch of wobble.

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Tech Specs

Country of OriginUSA
FeaturesTrue-bypass, delay range: 15ms to 600ms, flashing LED in delay knob
Dimensions66 x 37 x 124
Unit Power Source9 Volt Batteries Mains