Zoom Multistomp MS-70CDR

Chorus, delay and reverb pedal

The latest pedal in Zoom's MultiStomp line does away with the MS-50G and MS-100BT's amp and overdrive models, and instead focuses its efforts on chorus, delay and reverb. The MS-70CDR features exclusive all-new models of pedals cloned from the likes of Eventide, Strymon and TC Electronic.

"The MS-70CDR features exclusive all-new models of pedals cloned from the likes of Eventide, Strymon and TC Electronic"

Three push-button knobs adjust onscreen parameters, while four cursor keys scroll through effects and add or remove them. You can chain up to six together and save them as one of 50 patches. Assigning a patch to a letter of the alphabet lets you to scroll through them using the footswitch.

On the whole, the effects are impressive, with the reverbs a real highlight - soundscapers will love Space Hole's modulation and Particle's mangled reverberations.

The huge range of delays also inspires, from analogue-voiced classics to more out-there settings such as Trigger Hold Delay, which samples your guitar. Choruses range from the pristine Mirage to the warbly Clone, and while the tones aren't quite as chewy as a good analogue chorus, the choice is staggering.

So if you're after a highly tweakable chorus, delay and reverb pedal, the MS-70CDR is a worthy investment. We would have liked a few more modulation options, but at this price and with these sounds, it's hard to go wrong.

MusicRadar Rating

4 / 5 stars
Pros

Reverbs sound great. Huge range of delays and choruses. Good value.

Cons

Chorus tones can't live up to analogue.

Verdict

If you're after a highly tweakable chorus, delay and reverb pedal, the MS-70CDR is a worthy investment.

Available Outputs

2x1/4-inch jacks

No of Effects

86

Available Inputs

2x1/4-inch jacks

Unit Power Source

2 x AA Batteries Mains USB

Features

Buffered bypass

Review Policy
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