Homebrew Electronics Psilocybe

A classic sounding, well designed phaser from hand-builders HBE

Homebrew Electronics' Psilocybe phaser is designed to replicate a range of sounds, from sixties psychedelia to seventies funk and Van Halen lead tones.

 

The two main controls are standard; Regen sets the amount of phase-shifting that will be applied to the signal, while Speed adjusts the modulation rate. In addition to these, there are two toggle switches for greater tonal flexibility. The first is an EQ filter, offering a choice between a rich, full sound (left position) and a tighter, brighter sound (right position). The other toggle switch adjusts the phaser's waveform, from a fast vibrato effect to a classic phase shifter sound.

 

In use

 

Although the Psilocybe doesn't do anything particularly extreme, it's capable of a good range of classic phase sounds. We were able to get quite close to the Small Stone and Phase 90 sounds without much trouble, and there's scope for plenty more. The 'classic' position on the second toggle switch is the most immediately pleasing, probably because of the more complex sounding waveform, but the vibrato setting, while starker and more obvious, is no less useable.

MusicRadar Rating

4 / 5 stars
Pros

Does a good job of simulating several classic sounds.

Cons

If you don’t expect extreme sounds, there’s nothing to dislike.

Verdict

Although the Psilocybe doesn't do stomach-churning extreme phasing, you are unlikely to be looking at a pedal such as this if those sounds are what you crave. For those that want a phaser capable of almost any 'classic' sound, the Psilocybe more than does the job.

Available Controls

EQ filter Level Regeneration Waveform

Country of Origin

USA

Device Type

Phaser Pedal

Effect Types

Phaser

Review Policy
All MusicRadar's reviews are by independent product specialists, who are not aligned to any gear manufacturer or retailer. Our experts also write for renowned magazines such as Guitarist, Total Guitar, Computer Music, Future Music and Rhythm. All are part of Future PLC, the biggest publisher of music making magazines in the world.

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