HardWire V-10 Power Block

A blockbuster pedal power source

HardWire's V-10 Power Block is designed for players tired of the noise and hum of cheap PSUs, offering a quality unit that covers the spectrum of common pedal power needs.

You get 10 fully isolated outputs, with 1600mA total output. There are four 150mA nine-volts; two switchable nine-/12-volts at 200mA; two switchable nine-/12-volts at 150mA; and two more 150mA nine-volts, which can starve voltage down to five volts.

"The V-10's secret weapon lies in its switchable sections"

The V-10's secret weapon lies in its switchable sections, though - they can each be merged to form 400mA or 300mA outputs for hungry units.

17 right-angled power cables are included with the V-10, including centre-positive and 3.5mm mini-plug cables, plus nine-volt battery clips. The unit itself is larger than the Voodoo Lab Pedal Power 2 Plus, but its aluminium enclosure means it's lighter, and will mount conveniently underneath most Pedaltrain pedalboards.

In Use

We ran the V-10 to full capacity, utilising all 10 outputs (with a handful of analogue pedals daisy-chained from one output), and merged outputs for high-current pedals such as the DigiTech Whammy and various digital delays and reverbs. This induced no noise or adverse tonal effects whatsoever - just pure, quiet power.

MusicRadar Rating

4 / 5 stars
Pros

Good quality build. Switchable sections. Quiet.

Cons

You're spending £179 on a glorified extension lead, albeit a very clever, well-built one.

Verdict

If you're serious about your 'board (and if you're using all 10 outputs, you probably are), the V-10 is a good contender for your power needs.

Unit Power Source

Mains

Case Material

Aircraft-grade aluminium

Features

Power for up to 10 effects pedals; merge outputs to connect high power pedals

Review Policy
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