Alesis Palmtrack

Alesis' multi-mic gives performance and price

The number of portable digital stereo recorders on the market has really grown in the last couple of years.

However, the Alesis PalmTrack is slightly different from the norm as it boasts four onboard microphones and is designed to record stereo or four-capsule omni audio in any location.

You can choose two-mic or four-mic operation, the latter allowing you to place the PalmTrack in the middle of a rehearsal room to capture sound from all around.

External mic or line level signals are also accepted and you can hold the PalmTrack in your hand, place it on a flat surface or attach it to a camera tripod or, via an adapter, to a microphone stand.

Operation is very easy - you can be recording within seconds of switching the PalmTrack on, the gain being easily set by a high/low mic gain switch and up and down Record Gain incremental buttons.

Onboard processing includes optional vocal enhancement when recording for boosting vocal frequencies and you can treat your recorded audio to bass compensation for reducing the proximity effect in close-mic situations or add chorus, pitch shift, delay or reverb.

The PalmTrack has an onboard tuner but is not particularly set up for phrase-training as there is no option for altering audio speed. However, you can loop audio and there is a voice cancelling function that works on some audio

MusicRadar Rating

4 / 5 stars
Pros

Ease of use. Pocket sized. Optional microphone arrays.

Cons

No option to alter audio speed.

Verdict

Its no-nonsense design makes it an ideal 'point and shoot' stereo recorder at a great price.

Description

Stereo digital recorder with four-capsule omni patterns

Features

Onboard speakers, four onboard mics, MP3 Voice Cancel, Tuner, threaded mounting point

Weight (g)

143

Review Policy
All MusicRadar's reviews are by independent product specialists, who are not aligned to any gear manufacturer or retailer. Our experts also write for renowned magazines such as Guitarist, Total Guitar, Computer Music, Future Music and Rhythm. All are part of Future PLC, the biggest publisher of music making magazines in the world.

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