Washburn WD 10SCE

For years, Washburn's D series was an upper-entry-level staple, and it's recently been rejigged as the WD Series.

The WD10SCE here follows its predecessors' dreadnought shape, while acoustic staples such as the solid spruce top and mahogany back and sides (we're talking laminated at this price) meet with a Fishman Isys+ preamp.

"What you get instead is more focused towards the bottom of the midrange."

Our review model has a high gloss black finish, which is spectacular in the showroom, but collects fingerprints like a forensics expert.

The first few strums confirm it's loud with a low-end punch that remains controlled when you give it some welly, and there's a nice sheen to the top end. Plug in, though, and the bass doesn't quite transfer. What you get instead is more focused towards the bottom of the midrange, which will help to seat this guitar in the mix.

The preamp's two-band EQ, phase switch and tuner might not offer everything you want for tonal control, but they're certainly all you need. The WD 10SCE sets the bar high from the off. With its great sound quality and solid features, it continues Washburn's track record of producing fine acoustics at even finer prices.

Had it not been for some minor blemishes around the edge of the soundhole and the slight fatiguing after barring chords, it might have swayed us from the start.

MusicRadar Rating

4 / 5 stars
Pros

Great sound quality. Solid features. Good price.

Cons

Minor blemishes around the edge of the soundhole.

Verdict

The WD 10SCE sets the bar high with great quality sound and features and a spectacular finish. It suffers from slight fatiguing after barring chords.

Available Finish

Black, natural

Back and Sides Finish

Mahogany

Fingerboard Material

Rosewood

Hardware

chrome

Scale Length (mm)

648

Year of Origin

2011

Review Policy
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