BC Rich Virgo

We'd wager that, as soon as any guitarist mentions weird shapes, the name of BC Rich jumps to mind.

That company has made its huge reputation on the back of some classic designs and, although such restrained models as the EM-1 may widen the brand's appeal, most of us would prefer the likes of The Beast and Warlock.

The Virgo shape was launched in 2004 and its symmetrical design mixes outrageous points with smooth curves, making it an instant smash - just mind yourself on the SOB headstock...

It's a lightweight guitar, clocking in at less than six pounds, with a nato body and bolt-on maple neck that offers an ebony fingerboard and a modern thin feel. Pickups are both BC Rich models, designed to provide a huge level of output, and controlled by a standard three-way plus master volume and tone pots.

Sounds

Top of the range BC Rich guitars are among the best you can buy, but models from lower down the scale tend to offer fewer tonal possibilities.

However, if you're into metal and the hardest of rock then most options, and this one in particular, will easily float your boat.

There's plenty of drive on tap with rhythm passages nicely balanced between restrained aggression and sheer aural murder. Oh, and be careful of the neck pickup: at high volumes it can fell buildings...

MusicRadar Rating

3.5 / 5 stars
Pros

A solid performace. A great shape.

Cons

It's a little lightweight.

Verdict

It's not the best guitar we've seen, but with that name on the headstock, it almost doesn't matter.

Available Controls

3 Position Toggle Pickup Selector Switch Tone Volume

Available Finish

Onyx

Body Binding

None

Bolt-on Neck

Yes

Bridge

Tune-o-matic

Country of Origin

Korea

Fingerboard Material

Ebony

Guitar Body Material

Nato (Eastern Mahogany)

Neck Material

Maple

No. of Frets

24

Scale Length (mm)

648

Top Finish

Polished Gloss

Width at Nut (mm)

43

Review Policy
All MusicRadar's reviews are by independent product specialists, who are not aligned to any gear manufacturer or retailer. Our experts also write for renowned magazines such as Guitarist, Total Guitar, Computer Music, Future Music and Rhythm. All are part of Future PLC, the biggest publisher of music making magazines in the world.