Analogman AR20DL Analog Delay

Most digital delay stompboxes have features designed to emulate that vintage analogue delay sound if you want it, but how about the real thing?

Analogman's AR20DL is a real analogue delay using old-style bucket brigade chips to create those blurry, warm repeats that blend so nicely into the overall sound.

Based on pedals like the BOSS DM-2 and Ibanez AD80, the AR20DL is a very solidly built little stompbox not too dissimilar in size or design to a BOSS compact pedal.

It runs from a 9V battery or power supply and has controls for delay time, delay level and feedback. Unlike all the other Analogman pedals that are entirely built in the US, this one is more cosmopolitan in origin, being sourced from a Japanese company, made in China and then further modified by Analogman in the USA.

Sounds

The AR20DL does all the things an analogue delay should - from metallic bathtub reverb, through rockabilly slapback to longer repeats up to around 300ms, plus those downright spacey effects you can get by fiddling with the knobs - easily done as the knobs are tall, thin and nicely spaced.

Tonally the repeats are a tad brighter than a DM-2, with a touch more clarity, but they still dissipate in a way that really complements the guitar sound, enveloping and enhancing it.

It is unfortunate that the AR20DL is only available via internet sales and it's also unfortunate, though promising, that each new batch sells out really quickly.

MusicRadar Rating

4 / 5 stars
Pros

Compact size; very usable vintage sound; easily tweakable knobs.

Cons

In short supply. Internet sales only.

Verdict

This pedal offers a viable alternative to resorting to seeking out battered vintage units on Ebay.

Features

The XL option doubles the delay time by using two delay chips instead of one. No other changes, just the delay time.

Effect Types

Delay

Review Policy
All MusicRadar's reviews are by independent product specialists, who are not aligned to any gear manufacturer or retailer. Our experts also write for renowned magazines such as Guitarist, Total Guitar, Computer Music, Future Music and Rhythm. All are part of Future PLC, the biggest publisher of music making magazines in the world.

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