OTO Machines' BAM kicks it old-school in the reverb department

New desktop digital reverb unit takes its cues from yesteryear

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NOxzjc_VWU

OTO Machines has announced a new desktop effects unit called BAM, a stereo reverb processor that takes inspiration from the highly sought-after late '70s and early '80s digital reverbs.

Following on from OTO's BIM desktop delay machine, the French company has taken a similar approach to BAM's development by studying a decade's worth of digital reverb units in the hope of capturing some of their musicality and character.

The technology used in BAM is very similar to these reverbs. You'll find 16-bit converters, 20-bit fixed-point processing, analogue filtering and even an input transformer transient simulator. Out of the seven reverb algorithms inside BAM, some are influenced by the early structures, and some are completely brand new.

The result is a "very musical and unique reverb processor", housed in a compact desktop format, offering MIDI control and 36 user presets.

BAM will be available to buy soon for €460 excluding VAT. More information can be found on the OTO Machines website.

Features include:

  • 7 algorithms: Room, Hall, Plate, Ambient, Chorus, Non-Linear and Primitive
  • Input gain up to +15 dB with analog clipping
  • Pre Delay up to 500 ms (with the PRE DELAY pot) or 1500 ms (with the TAP switch)
  • Continuous control of the reverb Size parameter for fine tuning
  • Low-Cut Filter: 20 Hz, 80 Hz, 150 Hz, 250 Hz, 450 Hz
  • Hi-Cut Filter: 1,8 kHz, 4,5 kHz, 7 kHz, 9 kHz, 15 kHz
  • Chorus parameter can add modulation to the reverberator signal
  • Tap Tempo assignable to Pre Delay or Reverb Time
  • Freeze switch
  • 36 user presets
  • MIDI input: BAM responds to CCs and Pgm Change
  • 3 bypass modes: Relay, Spillover and Aux
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